E-Mailing Japanese Companies while Job Hunting

E-Mailing Japanese Companies while Job Hunting
Florian
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For many Japanese learners, the job hunt marks the time when they have to start writing “professional e-mails”. Not used to it? Use these templates in case you’re not sure about how to phrase your communication with HR.

General Rules

How each email looks differs depending on the contents, but there are some basic rules you should be aware of. Some of them are quite universal, while others are Japan-specific.

Reply as fast as possible

In general, it’s considered good manners to reply to an email within the same day. If you reply later (or just before the next day starts, e.g. in the depth of the night), you should add an apology and, if applicable, a reasonable explanation. Replying even faster – e.g. within a few hours of receiving the email – can easily earn you a few bonus points.

Occasionally, there will be times where you’re not sure if you should reply again. For example: The company messages you and asks you about your availability in a given time frame. You reply on which day and at which time you’re free. They mail you back and confirm the appointment. The matter’s settled. Should you write back once more?

The answer is “yes.” When in doubt, reply one last time, with a thank you message or a short back-confirmation (indicating that you’ve read the reply). In the above example, you could respond with something like “thank you for taking the time to arrange an appointment. I’m looking forward to the interview.”

Choose meaningful and short titles

During the job-hunting season, PR people deal with a lot of applicants and emails. To make it easier for them, you should not only make sure that the title of your mail is short and succinct, but also that you put your name there. If it doesn’t make the title too long, you can also add the name of your university.

When replying to e-mails, you should keep the “Re:” that (in most cases) automatically appears before the original title. Changing the title makes it harder to trace back the communication history. When you’re having long exchanges and the “Re”s keep piling up, it’s OK to remove a few of them to keep the title intelligible.

Follow Standard Patterns and Rules

People tend to think of Japanese business e-mails as traditional-style letters in a digital format. To be fair, Japanese business communication does heavily rely on established conventions and stock phrases.

However, that doesn’t mean that your e-mails have to be long. As long as you hit all the necessary points, a few lines can be enough (especially when there’s not much to say or the current chain of exchanges has been going on for a while).

When sending documents containing highly personal information (such as CVs) over the internet, it is common practice in Japan to use password-protected zip files. The password for the file is sent afterwards, in a separate e-mail. Despite how useless this may seem to you, is considered common (business) sense here. The main reason is that sending emails this way is part of the requirements for a widespread privacy protection certificate (called the Privacy Mark).

Examples

Below, you can find some templates to use when communicating with companies during you’re job hunt. We’re going to keep adding new examples in the future, but for now, it’s these five basic ones. The (italics in brackets) indicate parts of the e-mail that are there in the Japanese version but probably wouldn’t be used during an exchange in English.

Sending Documents

You can use this template not only for CVs, but also for Entry Sheets, visa documents, etc (just make sure to change the text). Sending a password-locked file is not a must. Some companies require it. Otherwise, it’s up to you. In case the “Privacy Mark” is displayed on the website of the company you’re applying to, it might be a good idea to do it.

JAPANESE

件名けんめい履歴書りれきしょをおおくりいたします (your name and university)

株式会社かぶしきがいしゃ〇〇〇〇
人事採用担当じんじさいようたんとう 〇〇さま

いつもお世話せわになります。
先日せんじつ説明会せつめいかい参加さんかいたしました○○大学だいがく△△学部がくぶの(your name)です。

添付てんぷファイルにて、履歴書りれきしょをお送おくりいたします。
いそがしい中恐縮なかきょうしゅくですが、ご査収さしゅうのほどよろしくおねがもうげます。

なお、添付てんぷファイルにパスワードを設定せっていしています。
パスワードはのちほどべつメールにておおくりいたします。
確認かくにんのほど、何卒なにとぞよろしくおねがもうげます。

(your name/signature)

ENGLISH

Title: CV (your name)

〇〇〇〇 Company
HR Department
Mr/Mrs 〇〇

This is (your name) from (your university). I attended your company seminar the other day.

In the attachments, you can find my CV.
(I’m sorry to bother you during such a busy time, but) please have a look at it.

I’ve protected the file with a password. I’ll send you the password in another mail(, so please make sure to check that as well.)

(your name/signature)

Sending a password separately

This is the mail that you send after the mail with your documents. It’s usually sent immediately afterwards.

JAPANESE

件名けんめい:【パスワード】履歴書りれきしょをおおくりいたします (your name and university)

株式会社かぶしきがいしゃ〇〇〇〇
人事採用担当じんじさいようたんとう 〇〇さま

さきほど履歴書りれきしょをおおくりしました(your university)の(your name)です。
添付てんぷファイルに設定せっていしたパスワードは下記かきとおりです。

パスワード: abcde12345

手数てすうをおかけしますが、何卒なにとぞよろしくおねがもうげます。

(your name/signature)

ENGLISH

Title: Password for CV (your name)

〇〇〇〇 Company
HR Department
Mr/Mrs 〇〇

Hello, this is (your name) from (your university). I sent you my CV earlier.
This is the password for the file attached in the previous mail.

Password: abcde12345

(I’m sorry to cause you extra trouble.)

(your name/signature)

Confirming an appointment

After attending a job fair, seminar etc, the company will usually send you a “thank you” mail for attending and provide you with some additional information about the next event or appointment. If the appointment doesn’t clash with your schedule, you just have to send a simple “thank you” mail back.

JAPANESE

件名けんめい面接日程めんせつにっていにつきまして (your name and university)

株式会社かぶしきがいしゃ〇〇〇〇
人事採用担当じんじさいようたんとう 〇〇さま

世話せわになっております。
〇〇大学だいがくの(your name)です。

面接日程めんせつにっていのご連絡れんらくをいただきましてまことにありがとうございます。
提示ていじいただいた日程にっていのうち、下記かきにて貴社きしゃうかがいたくおもいます。

日時にちじ:〇がつにち(水)14:00~
場所ばしょ:〇〇ビル 5F

いそがしいなか面接めんせつのためのお時間じかんをいただき、大変嬉たいへんうれしくおもいます。

当日とうじつ何卒なにとぞよろしくおねがいたします。

(your name/signature)

ENGLISH

Title: Regarding the interview appointment (your name and university)

〇〇〇〇 Company
HR Department
Mr/Mrs 〇〇

This is (your name) from (your university).

Thank your for inviting me to an interview.
I’d like to visit you in the following time slot.

Date: 〇〇/〇〇 (Wed) 14:00~
Place: 〇〇 Building, 5th floor

I’m thankful for being given the opportunity for an interview at your company (during such a busy time).
I’m looking forward to meeting you.

(your name/signature)

Rearranging an appointment

Sometimes, none of the pre-arranged time slots that the HR department sent you match with your personal schedule. In this case, apologize first and then propose some other time slots where you’re available. If possible, try to provide at least three different options to make the whole process shorter and less of a hassle for both the company and yourself.

JAPANESE

件名けんめい:Re:(old mail title)

株式会社かぶしきがいしゃ〇〇〇〇
人事採用担当じんじさいようたんとう 〇〇さま

世話せわになっております。
○○大学だいがく△△学部がくぶの(your name)です。

面接日程めんせつにっていのご連絡れんらくをいただきましてまことにありがとうございます。

勝手かってもうげて恐縮きょうしゅくですが、おつたえいただきました日程にってい都合つごうわるく、
貴社きしゃうかがうことができません。
おそりますが、下記かき日程にってい再調整さいちょうせいいただくことは可能かのうでしょうか。

・〇がつにち(月) 15:00 ~ 18:00
・〇がつにち(木) 10:00 ~ 12:00
・〇がつにち(金) 14:00 ~ 18:00

手数てすうおかけしてもうわけありませんがご検討けんとうのほど、何卒なにとぞよろしくおねがもうげます。

(your name/signature)

ENGLISH

Title: Re: (old mail title)

〇〇〇〇 Company
HR Department
Mr/Mrs 〇〇

This is (your name) from ○○ university.

Thank you for inviting me to an interview.

Unfortunately, due to personal circumstances, I’m not able to visit your company during the time slots you sent me.
(I’m sorry to cause you so much trouble, but) would it be possible to move the interview to one of the following time slots?

– 〇/〇 (Mon) 15:00 ~ 17:00
– 〇/〇 (Thu) 10:00 ~ 12:00
– 〇/〇 (Fri) 14:30 ~ 16:30

(I’m sorry to bother you with this, but I would gratly appreciate if you looked into the matter.)

(your name/signature)

Dropping out of the Recruitment Process

For the final one, let’s assume you’ve been applying for multiple jobs at once and have received an offer from your favorite company earlier than expected. You definitely want to take the job, but now you have to also tell the other companies you’re in contact with that you’re not interested in attending any seminars or tests or doing interviews anymore. This can be somewhat awkward, but it’s necessary (and if you’ve collected your share of rejections, it can feel quite good to be on the ‘other end’ for once).

JAPANESE

件名けんめい選考辞退せんこうじたいのご連絡れんらく (your name and university)

株式会社かぶしきがいしゃ〇〇〇〇
人事採用担当じんじさいようたんとう 〇〇さま

世話せわになっております。
○○大学だいがく△△学部がくぶの(your name)です。

先日せんじつ次回面接じかいめんせつ日程にってい案内あんないしていただき、まことにありがとうございました。
次回じかいがつにち面接めんせつのお時間じかんをいただいておりましたが、この度一身上たびいっしんじょう都合つごうにより、選考せんこう辞退じたいさせていただきたく、ご連絡れんらくいたしました。
いままで会社説明会かいしゃせつめいかい面接めんせつにて貴重きちょうなお時間じかんいていただいたにもかかわらず、まこともうわけございません。

本来ほんらい直接ちょくせつびすべきとろこですが、メールでのご連絡れんらくとなりましたこと、かさねておびをもうげます。
何卒なにとぞ了承りょうしょういただけますとさいわいです。

末筆まっぴつながら、貴社きしゃ益々ますますのご発展はってんをおいのもうげます。

(your name/signature)

ENGLISH

Title: Withdrawal from Selection Process (your name and university)

〇〇〇〇 Company
HR Department
Mr/Mrs 〇〇

This is (your name) from ○○ university.

Thank you for inviting the next interview the other day.
The interview was scheduled for 〇/〇, but due to personal circumstances, I would like to withdraw from the selection process at your company.
(I’m sorry that I have to send you a response like this after having attended your company’s seminars and had the opportunity for multiple interviews.)

Furthermore, I’d like to apologize that I’m letting you know about this via e-mail when I should have contacted you directly.

(I wish you and your company success in the future.)

(your name/signature)

E-Mailing like the Japanese

Do you see the patterns? Once you get a hold of them, you just have to add some variety to your vocabulary of stock phrases (different ways of expressing the same thing etc), do some tweaks here and there to fit your specific case and you won’t stand out among Japanese applicants at all.

Japanese expect there to be a relatively wide gap between face-to-face and written communication, so you don’t have to be able to talk in “e-mail style” (which is usually one politeness level above what people actually use during everyday work). However, don’t over-rely on copy and paste, as just using pre-made phrases from the internet suggests you’re too lazy to write your own sentences.

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Florian

My love for ninjas and interest in Chinese characters (kanji) were what first made me come to Japan, as a high school student. Over ten years and many visits later, I’ve found a job here and have chosen it as my new home.

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